Galerie Ethiopiques is back!

After a long Covid-19 hibernation, Galerie Ethiopiques will re-open soon in a bright L-shape space in Rue Potin X Abdoulaye Seck Marie Parsine. Our season will – so we hope – properly ignite in the autumn but we will be starting with a photo exhibition “Eureka Photo” already on 1st of April. This will give you the opportunity to see also our co-working space and cafeteria where you can have a pause and sip a cappuccino, tea or a fresh fruit juice.

If you would like to follow Galerie Ethiopiques and its events in the future, have a look at our Instagram page or Facebook page, as well as our website. You can also stay informed with what’s going by following this blog via #ethiopiques.

Looking forward to seeing you very soon!

Galerie Éthiopique organizes exhibitions, end-of-residency events and film screenings at Rue Potin X Abdoulaye Seck Marie Parsine in Saint-Louis of Senegal. More information: Tel. +221 77 143 88 90 or info[at]ethiopiques.gallery

Open call for artists’ residency

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Open call
 – Kristinestad, FINLAND August 2020: art, weaving and pottery

Kristinestad Artists’ Residency is a non-profit and artist/volunteer run programme in the idyllic wooden town of Kristinestad on the Finnish West coast. We are now inviting artists for a stay between 2 and 29 August 2020. Anyone wanting to make use of our weaving and pottery facilities is particularly welcome, but the programme is open to creatives of all art and craft disciplines.

If you are into nature, silence and slow living, this setting is for you. Resources and sources of inspiration also include vernacular architecture and traditional crafts. Looms, ceramics facilities, textile dyeing and lino cutting tools are available. Collaborations with the local community are possible, especially with schools. Exhibitions, shows, workshops etc. are encouraged.

We offer a variety of simple but comfortable accommodation options – mostly in traditional wooden buildings – and workspaces with wifi connection. Before and throughout the stay, residency hosts will be available for project research, linguistic assistance, finding materials and tools as well as establishing contacts locally. The residency fee is 600 Euro.
To apply, please send us an informal letter by email and tell us why you would like to come to Kristinestad and what you would like to do during your residency. We would like to hear from you by 15 March. The selection will be announced by 22 March.

For application instructions and more information, see our website http://www.kristinestadresidency.org

 

ABC in Wolof

Did you ever wonder why it matters to learn things in your mother tongue? And more so, to be able to also write it correctly? Many countries with colonial past still struggle with this and such is also the case of Senegal. We had the pleasure of hosting Clayton Junior, a designer from Brazil, at Waaw Centre for Art and Design for an art residency program and his project in collaboration with a local school in Saint-Louis is one very refreshing example of how art can contribute to pedagogical challenges. Please click on this link to access a video and read on!

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Waaw

Yes, Waaw*. In other words: Waaw Centre for Art and Design, the Artists’ Residence located in Saint-Louis, Senegal. This is a very short post to share with you a recent video that will briefly present what Waaw does. If you are more of a reader, you can also log on to Waaw’s homepage. Enjoy!

*Waaw is Wolof and means ‘yes’

Res Artis and the Midnight Sun

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Three days in the Arctic Circle in the company of Midnight sun and an international crowd of people from the Res Artis network is a guarantee of rather little amount of sleep. I put the blame on the sun that never went down! The 25th anniversary meeting of Res Artis worldwide network gathered together AiR people from all corners of the world to discuss common challenges and future perspectives in the field of artist-in-residence programs. This year’s theme put the emphasis on art and development of environmental, cultural, economic and social sustainability with a rich palette of panel discussions, workshops and visits to local art venues.

I was positively surprised especially by panel discussions on the future of art, science and technology programs. These panels gathered together residency directors, artists, scholars and natural scientists to present some of the current dialogues and practices between and among (bio) art, science and technology. There are some very interesting networks and programs out there in the field! On the other hand, I was also rather amused by one of the presentations titled “Anticipating the Other” that addressed, for example, the important fact that AiR programs need to take into account their host culture and indigenous populations in all their diversity so that exchanges between all parties concerned happen in equal terms. Very true and I could not agree more. Yet, based on our programs that we have run for six years now in Saint-Louis I couldn’t help thinking back how in our case it is the international artist who turns into The Other as soon as s/he lands in the country. One of the challenges then is to cope with that and make things happen. And artists do succeed every time and that’s what keeps us going!

One other theme popped up in the discussions here and there stating that “The world is open.” Is it really? Well, of course it is to some. While listening to panel discussions I kept wondering about the absence of the global south in this international meeting: in addition to us there was just one participant from Cameroon. Why are southern cultural actors missing out this kind of networking events? Shouldn’t these get-together meetings take place sometimes in the South as well? I was not completely alone with these thoughts and I only wish there had been just a little bit more time to those fantastic informal meetings. It is those informal encounters that facilitate more easily discussions on the realities and possibilities of cultural actors in the southern hemisphere, small volunteer based organizations such as ours included. Questions such as “what kind of strategies could be implemented to enable a better mobility for African artists” keep coming back to my mind over and over again. Or: “In what way can these global networks allow better accessibility to stakeholders in the global south so that they too can take part in creative programs funded by national and international art organizations?” As a result of one of the workshops that I attended we concluded that it really is time to sit down and create such inclusive funding systems that would share this particular goal and make the global network of art residencies truly global.

We have recently been downshifting our activity in Senegal towards more focused residencies and towards temporary summer programs in Finland. We have included in our annual program also a shorter mobile AiR program called Analog Extreme in Mauritania and these strategies seem to be the right direction for us to keep us going as a volunteer based AiR program. This summery Res Artis meeting in the Arctic Circle proved to be particularly important to us in terms of sharing and discussing the dynamics within large and small scale residency programs. As far as small residencies – or micro residencies – are concerned, there is even a specific network for such, coordinated in Japan.

In the Res Artis meeting there was also a panel discussion on “Art and culture as destinations.” To us this is actually the original engine of our entire existence in Saint-Louis of Senegal. I often wonder how the local actors in tourism businesses really take this concept into account in their policies and attempts of attracting visitors. Today’s tourist is no longer only a spectator but also someone who participates in the life of various local communities when it is possible. Art residencies promote sustainable tourism by default and this is what Waaw does per se even if we still have the impression that almost nobody has yet fully understood this on the local level. Artists practice slow tourism – imagine what it will be like in the post fossil fuel era! If people in the tourism branch ask themselves why anybody would want to stay longer than one or two nights in Saint-Louis my answer to them would be: artists are already doing it!